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MGT Dried Fruit

We are Marjan dried fruit company. Our main activity is producing dry fruit. Our products are exported to whole world. So we are known as producer, supplier and exporter of dried fruits and nuts which all their origin is Iran. Persian saffron is one of the most famous product in the world. Marjan dried fruit is exporting the high quality Persian saffron from 2004. As well as saffron, Iranian mamra almond is one of our best products with pure quality. Iranian pistachio, raisin and dates are other dried fruits that we are producing. Iran dried fruits are different in quality with other origins. That’s why we are supplier and exporter of Iran raisin, pistachio and dates. Marjan dried fruit is also producer of green peeled pistachio kernels that is used for pastry and cookie. It is necessary to mention that the minimum quantity is 5Ton for almost all products (Dates, Pistachio, Almond, Raisin, dried fig, apricot, walnutwalnut and barberry). So we can say that we are only whole seller (wholesale). Iran date fruit has so many types that Mazafati and Sayer date are one of the most known. Date concentrate (date liquid honey, date liquid sugar and date liquid syrup) are made from high quality Iranian dates. List of our product ready to be exported are as below: Iran pistachio (Round fandoghi pistachio supplier, long Akbari pistachio supplier, long ahmadaghai pistachio, jumbo kalleghouchi pistachio). Iranian raisin (Sultana light brown raisin tizabi, Sultana dark brown raisin aftabi, jumbo yellow raisin zard malayer, green jumbo raisin sabz malayer and golden angoori raisin). Persian date fruit (Piarom or piyarom, Mazafati fresh date known as bam date, chopped or chapped date, Sayer with seed and sayer without seed, Zahedi yellow dates, Kabkab semi dried date, ShahabiShahabi and Rabbi date). Persian famous saffron (All red sargol saffron, pooshal mancha saffron, dasteh bunch saffron and saffron powder provided from all red and pooshal). Iranian barberry (dane anari or shiny red and also puffy or pofaki). Dried fig (closed mouth A,AA,AAA and open mouth A,AA,AAA). Almond (Normel kernel, mamra almond kernel, paper skin poost kaghazi almond and hard shell sangi almond). We are looking forward to have this opportunity to serve our trusted customers in long-term business.

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We are pleased to hear that you are interested in our products. We assure you that your order will receive out best attention.  

 

We wish to invite you to meet us in upcoming exhibitions to discuss our existing business and our future prospects.

 

Clearly see and track what is coming and going. We are keeping our customers informed before they ask.

 

We invite you to try the Iranian recipes which include our products

Raw Material:

The primary raw material for making raisins is grapes. To make 1 lb (453.59 g) of raisins, over 4 lb (1,814.36 g) of fresh grapes are required. These grapes must have certain qualities in order to produce quality raisins. For example, they must ripen early and be easy to dry. Additionally, they must have a soft texture, not stick together when stored, have no seeds, and have a pleasing flavor. The most important grapes for raisin production include Thompson Seedless, Black Corinth, Fiesta, Muscats, and Sultans.

 

By far, the most widely grown raisin grape is the Thompson Seedless variety. They are used in the production of over half the world's raisins. Ninety percent of these come from California. The Thompson was first developed in 1872 by William Thompson, who created it by taking cuttings from an English seedless grape and grafting them with a Muscat grape vine. The resulting plant produced the first Thompson seedless grapes. It is believed that all of the subsequent Thompson seedless vines came from this original grafting.

 

The Thompson seedless is a white, thinskinned grape, which produces the best raisins available today. Its small berries are oval and elongated. It does not contain seeds and has a high sugar content. From a raisin production standpoint, Thompson grapes are ideal because they ripen fairly early in the season and do not stick to each other during shipping.

 

The Black Corinth is a grape that originated in Greece, which has become an important variety of raisin grape. They are about one fourth the size of the Thompson grapes and have a juicy, tangy/tart flavor. These grapes are quite small, spherical in shape, and reddish-black in color. They are thin skinned and nearly seedless. They make good raisins and are excellent for production because they ripen early and dry easily. Because of their flavor, they are more often used for baking cookies, specialty breads, and fruitcakes than for eating.

 

The primary raw material for making raisins is grapes. To make 1 lb (453.59 g) of raisins, over 4 lb (1,814.36 g) of fresh grapes are required. These grapes must have certain qualities in order to produce quality raisins. For example, they must ripen early and be easy to dry. Additionally, they must have a soft texture, not stick together when stored, have no seeds, and have a pleasing flavor. The most important grapes for raisin production include Thompson Seedless, Black Corinth, Fiesta, Muscats, and Sultans.

 

By far, the most widely grown raisin grape is the Thompson Seedless variety. They are used in the production of over half the world's raisins. Ninety percent of these come from California. The Thompson was first developed in 1872 by William Thompson, who created it by taking cuttings from an English seedless grape and grafting them with a Muscat grape vine. The resulting plant produced the first Thompson seedless grapes. It is believed that all of the subsequent Thompson seedless vines came from this original grafting.

 

The Thompson seedless is a white, thinskinned grape, which produces the best raisins available today. Its small berries are oval and elongated. It does not contain seeds and has a high sugar content. From a raisin production standpoint, Thompson grapes are ideal because they ripen fairly early in the season and do not stick to each other during shipping.

 

The Black Corinth is a grape that originated in Greece, which has become an important variety of raisin grape. They are about one fourth the size of the Thompson grapes and have a juicy, tangy/tart flavor. These grapes are quite small, spherical in shape, and reddish-black in color. They are thin skinned and nearly seedless. They make good raisins and are excellent for production because they ripen early and dry easily. Because of their flavor, they are more often used for baking cookies, specialty breads, and fruitcakes than for eating.

 

Farming:

The primary raw material for making raisins is grapes. To make 1 lb (453.59 g) of raisins, over 4 lb (1,814.36 g) of fresh grapes are required. These grapes must have certain qualities in order to produce quality raisins. For example, they must ripen early and be easy to dry. Additionally, they must have a soft texture, not stick together when stored, have no seeds, and have a pleasing flavor. The most important grapes for raisin production include Thompson Seedless, Black Corinth, Fiesta, Muscats, and Sultans.

By far, the most widely grown raisin grape is the Thompson Seedless variety. They are used in the production of over half the world's raisins. Ninety percent of these come from California. The Thompson was first developed in 1872 by William Thompson, who created it by taking cuttings from an English seedless grape and grafting them with a Muscat grape vine. The resulting plant produced the first Thompson seedless grapes. It is believed that all of the subsequent Thompson seedless vines came from this original grafting.

The Thompson seedless is a white, thin skinned grape, which produces the best raisins available today. Its small berries are oval and elongated. It does not contain seeds and has high sugar content. From a raisin production standpoint, Thompson grapes are ideal because they ripen fairly early in the season and do not stick to each other during shipping.

Harvesting and drying

  •  Starting in late August and continuing through September, the grapes are harvested. At this point in the year they are at their optimum sweetness. Bunches of grapes are handpicked by field workers and placed on paper trays, which are laid out on the ground between the vine rows. To provide a good surface for the trays, the soil between the rows is leveled.
  • Depending on the weather, the grapes are allowed to dry on the trays for two to four weeks. During this time, the moisture content of the grape is reduced from 75% to under 15% and the color of the fruit changes to a brownish purple. At night, the trays are rolled to minimize the accumulation of sand and protect against raisin moth infestation. The paper trays are embedded with a compound, which kills insects that can damage the grapes as they dry. After the fruit is dried, the paper trays are rolled up around the raisins to form a package. The rolls are gathered and stored in boxes or bins before being transported by truck to a processing plant.

Quality Control

Quality control is an important part of each step in the raisin making process. While the grapes are growing, they are checked for ripeness by squeezing the juice from a grape and using a refractometer. This allows the growers to determine how much sugar is in the grape. They are also tasted and their weight per volume is measured to give a measure of the quality of the fruit. During picking, workers are careful not to place bunches with insects or mold on the trays. They also try not to break berries as the liquid will attract insects. Knives are used to cut down the grape bunches to prevent damage. At the factory, the raisins are thoroughly inspected. They are also subjected to a variety of laboratory analyses to ensure the production of a consistent, high quality product.