Call Us: (+98)2188359023
fl

MGT Dried Fruit

We are Marjan dried fruit company. Our main activity is producing dry fruit. Our products are exported to whole world. So we are known as producer, supplier and exporter of dried fruits and nuts which all their origin is Iran. Persian saffron is one of the most famous product in the world. Marjan dried fruit is exporting the high quality Persian saffron from 2004. As well as saffron, Iranian mamra almond is one of our best products with pure quality. Iranian pistachio, raisin and dates are other dried fruits that we are producing. Iran dried fruits are different in quality with other origins. That’s why we are supplier and exporter of Iran raisin, pistachio and dates. Marjan dried fruit is also producer of green peeled pistachio kernels that is used for pastry and cookie. It is necessary to mention that the minimum quantity is 5Ton for almost all products (Dates, Pistachio, Almond, Raisin, dried fig, apricot, walnutwalnut and barberry). So we can say that we are only whole seller (wholesale). Iran date fruit has so many types that Mazafati and Sayer date are one of the most known. Date concentrate (date liquid honey, date liquid sugar and date liquid syrup) are made from high quality Iranian dates. List of our product ready to be exported are as below: Iran pistachio (Round fandoghi pistachio supplier, long Akbari pistachio supplier, long ahmadaghai pistachio, jumbo kalleghouchi pistachio). Iranian raisin (Sultana light brown raisin tizabi, Sultana dark brown raisin aftabi, jumbo yellow raisin zard malayer, green jumbo raisin sabz malayer and golden angoori raisin). Persian date fruit (Piarom or piyarom, Mazafati fresh date known as bam date, chopped or chapped date, Sayer with seed and sayer without seed, Zahedi yellow dates, Kabkab semi dried date, ShahabiShahabi and Rabbi date). Persian famous saffron (All red sargol saffron, pooshal mancha saffron, dasteh bunch saffron and saffron powder provided from all red and pooshal). Iranian barberry (dane anari or shiny red and also puffy or pofaki). Dried fig (closed mouth A,AA,AAA and open mouth A,AA,AAA). Almond (Normel kernel, mamra almond kernel, paper skin poost kaghazi almond and hard shell sangi almond). We are looking forward to have this opportunity to serve our trusted customers in long-term business.

Headline
  • Loading

CR

 

We are pleased to hear that you are interested in our products. We assure you that your order will receive out best attention.  

 

We wish to invite you to meet us in upcoming exhibitions to discuss our existing business and our future prospects.

 

Clearly see and track what is coming and going. We are keeping our customers informed before they ask.

 

We invite you to try the Iranian recipes which include our products

A degree of uncertainty surrounds the origin of the English word, "saffronsaffron" although it can be traced to have stemmed immediately from 12th-century Old French term SafranSafran, which comes from the Latin word safranum. Safranum comes from the PersianPersian intercessor Za'ferân. Old PersianOld Persian is the first language in which the use of saffron in cooking is recorded, with references dating back thousands of years. In fact some sources argue that it originated from Middle East/PersiaPersia and became associated with Greek, Spanish, and Indian cuisines.

 

Saffron was detailed in a 7th-century. Documentation of saffron’s use over the span of 4,000 years in the treatment of some 90 illnesses has been uncovered. Saffron-based pigments have indeed been found in 50,000 year-old depictions of prehistoric places in northwest Iran.

Records shows the use of saffron goes back to ancient times when it was used as a dye, in perfumes and drugs, as well as for culinary purposes.

 

Almost all saffron grows in a belt bounded by the Mediterranean in the west, and the rugged region encompassing Iran and Kashmir in the east. The other continents produce smaller amounts. Some 300 t (300,000 kg) of dried whole threads and powder are gleaned yearly of which 50 t (50,000 kg) is top-grade "coupe" saffron. Iran answers for around 90–93% of global production and exports much of it. A few of Iran's drier eastern and southeastern provinces, including Fars, Kerman, and those in the Khorasan region, glean the bulk of modern global production. In 2005, the second-ranked Greece produced 5.7 t (5,700.0 kg), while Morocco and Kashmir, tied for third rank, each produced 2.3 t (2,300.0 kg).

 

In Iran, the world's leading producer, the erstwhile and northeasterly Khorasan Province, which in 2004 was divided in three, grows 95 percent of Iranian saffron: the hinterlands of Birjand, Ghayen, Ferdows in South Khorasan Province, along with areas abutting Gonabad and Torbat-e Heydarieh in Razavi Khorasan Province, are its key cropping areas.